Activision Takes Legal Action Against EngineOwning Cheat Provider

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s oAs attention begins to turn towards the launch of Season 1 Reloaded for Warzone Pacific, it has been revealed that Activision has taken legal action against EngineOwning, one of the largest Call of Duty cheat providers. Since the battle royale moved to Caldera in late 2021, the publisher has taken action against hackers by introducing a dedicated anti-cheat known as RICOCHET.

The addition of the kernel-level driver has drastically reduced the number of hackers dropping into the battle royale, but there are still a number of cheat providers selling hacks, much to the annoyance of the community that's longing for a cheat-free experience.

Read More: Warzone Pacific Season 1 Reloaded: Start Date, Roadmap, Leaks & Everything We Know

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Activision EngineOwning Legal Action

Activision EngineOwning Legal Action
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The lawsuit was filed on January 4th in the state of California and claims EngineOwning has "engaged in numerous unlawful acts" by selling a range of cheats to players looking to get an unfair advantage. By submitting a case, the publisher "seeks to stop unlawful conduct" being performed by the cheat provider.

EngineOwning is one of the biggest cheat providers in Call of Duty, providing cheats for Warzone and Vanguard and regularly attempts to bypass the kernel-level driver that arrived in December 2021. The cheat provider regularly pokes fun at Warzone's lack of anti-cheat but this latest intervention is one that is unlikely to be contested. On the same day the lawsuit was filed, the provider revealed it has been working on cheats for Overwatch, another Activision franchise.

Will EngineOwning Close Down For Good?

Considering Activision has managed to shut down several cheat providers by taking legal action, the chances of EngineOwning being taken down for good are relatively high. With the lawsuit stating the publisher is "entitled to monetary damages," it could prove expensive for the cheat provider. Whether EngineOwning will fight the case remains to be seen.